Rundetaarn

Last Saturday we had the good fortune of having both nice weather and a lazy day with no real plans (ignoring the ever-present spectre of Danish homework). We’ve been waiting for clear days to start working out way through the various towers in the city where you can get a good view out over the rooftops.

Presented with a brisk, sunny day and no pressing engagements, we seized the opportunity to go be tourists at the Rundetaarn (the Round Tower).

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The aptly named Rundetaarn

I’ve been really looking forward to visiting ever since I found out it has an ‘equestrian staircase’. Built in the mid-1600s as a church, library and observatory, they designed it such that a horse and carriage could haul books and astronomical instruments up to the top of the tower. The end result is a very photogenic, and very easy to climb, path up to the top, which has apparently been used by Russian Czars on horseback, cars and bicycle races.

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Much nicer than stairs, even without being on horseback

From the top you get a view over the centre of town. In hindsight it’s been good holding off for a few months before starting to visit these towers because it’s more fun looking out when you have a better idea of the city and its landmarks.

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Looking out to Rosenborg Slot and Kongens Have
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Past Stroeget to Christiansborg
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Towards the university and our old haunts around Studiestraede
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Towards our house, with the windfarms and bridge to Sweden far off in the distance

The Rundetaarn is technically still a functioning observatory, although it is only used by amateur enthusiasts.

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For peeping

It’s also an exhibition space, and a travelling exhibition from the Museum of Broken Relationships has just opened. The Museum of Broken Relationships is an art project-turned-museum based in Zagreb, Croatia, where people can divest themselves of symbolic items from past relationships. It is equal parts moving, crack-pot, tragic and banal and I really recommend it. Some of the more poignant items and accompanying explanations represent the demise of decades-long relationships, with or without a sense of closure and/or lingering anger. Others are more tragi-comic, when you realise that the histrionic text relates to a two month on-off relationship someone had at the start of this year – you will probably learn to live and love again, buddy, just hang in there…

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A strange collection

To end on a slightly more upbeat note than the detritus of failed couplings, we learned a great Danish phrase this week:

“Hvem har tisset på din sukkermad?”

Sukkermad, as I understand it, is a kids breakfast treat made of bread and butter with sugar sprinkled on top – so essentially the Danish version of fairy bread. The phrase is used to indicate someone has got out on the wrong side of the bed, and translates as follows:

“Ok, who has pissed on your fairy bread this morning?”

I find this phrase endlessly amusing – feel free to drop it into conversation wherever applicable.

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2 thoughts on “Rundetaarn

  1. Kerrie’s fairy bread has been especially damp since she has been forced to work 8 hours per day, 5 days per week. Also, I am surprised you are taking the stairs/ramp up these towers – I thought at first it was the mission of your climbing group to scale the outside.

    Liked by 1 person

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